22 juin 2024

Daily Impact European

We are an independent daily

STOP: police violence… but right to intentional violence?

Marches against police violence and racism took place across France this Saturday.

Marches took place on Saturday September 23 in different cities in France to demonstrate “against police violence”, at the call of the far left and various organizations, under close surveillance by the police.

Several elected officials from La France insoumise (LFI) were present, like MP Mathilde Panot, who praised the “unity” of “the 198 organizations calling for this march” – trade union organizations, politicians and other neighborhood collectives. popular. This demonstration “is certainly not what Mr. Darmanin says, that is to say an anti-police march, but a march in defense of the Republic,” she added.

At the start of the demonstration, many families gathered in a “national coordination against police violence” demanded the truth for “Othmane”, “Alassane”, or “Mahamadou”. Before departure, the crowd gathered on Boulevard Magenta chanted “Police everywhere, justice nowhere”, “No justice, no peace” and “Justice for Nahel”.

The demonstrations took place mostly peacefully, with the exception of the Parisian procession. After a peaceful departure around 3 p.m. from the Gare du Nord, a pre-procession of hundreds of individuals dressed in black and hooded formed in front of the organizations and collectives who had called for mobilization.

Arriving at the Anvers metro station, in the north of Paris, they damaged a Caisse d’Epargne bank branch.

They then threw projectiles at a police car stuck in traffic on Boulevard de Clichy. The car was attacked “with an iron bar,” said the Paris police headquarters.

One of the police officers then briefly got out of the vehicle with his weapon in hand to keep the demonstrators at bay, according to several videos posted on social networks, confirmed by a police source.

https://x.com/ArnaudCesarV/status/1705590565679599804?s=20

An “intervention by the Brav-M”, named after this controversial unit of police officers on motorcycles, “made it possible to stop the action and shelter” the police officers present in the vehicle, added the prefecture. Three police officers were slightly injured and three people were arrested, according to the Paris police prefect, Laurent Nuñez.

“We are currently working (…) to try to identify the perpetrators of this attack. We already have three people who are presumed to be involved in these facts who have been arrested,” added Mr. Nuñez.

“I strongly condemn these attacks and provide my support to the attacked and injured police officers,” police prefect Laurent Nuñez reacted on X (ex-Twitter). Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin also criticized: “this is where anti-cop hatred leads”.

https://x.com/NunezLaurent/status/1705602963274678701?s=20

The death three months ago of the 17-year-old teenager, killed by a police officer during a road check in Nanterre, triggered a wave of riots throughout the country. “The law kills”, also denounces a sign, with a statue representing justice with eyes crossed out in red, criticizing article 435-1 of the internal security code, which expands the possibility for the police to fire. in the event of refusal to comply.

Around 80,000 people marched across France and 15,000 in Paris, according to organizers. According to the Ministry of the Interior, 31,300 participants in France and 9,000 in Paris marched.

An investigation was opened into intentional violence against persons holding public authority after the attack on Saturday September 23 on a police car during the demonstration against police violence in Paris.

The new report, given this Sunday by the police headquarters, shows four police officers slightly injured in this attack (compared to three during the previous communication). In total, six police officers were injured in the Paris procession.

At this stage, eight participants suspected of having taken part in this violence were arrested, indicates the police headquarters.

Copyright©2023 IMPACT EUROPEAN. Tous droits réservés.

About The Author